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SharePoint 2010: What We Know and What We Want

Since the announcing of SharePoint 2010 this month, the community has been buzzing with what we know about ’10 and what we are still speculating about ’10. There isn’t a whole lot of concrete information out there yet, but I’ve compiled a list below of what I’ve seen so far. I’ve also started listing some of the pressing things that we, the SharePoint community, would like to see in ’10.

Confirmed:

  • So long MOSS! It seems like you’ve been renamed to just Microsoft SharePoint Server. We’ve called you so many things over the years that we’re hoping this name will actually stick.
  • PerformancePoint Monitoring & Analytics functions will be bundled into the Server license
  • Users will be able to open/edit/save/collaborate on Office documents through a web browser
  • Native support for ODF and PDF seems to be a safe confirmation as Office System SP2 will now support editing of both formats.
  • All Forms Server functions bundled with 2010 – There are clients who signed on for Forms Server standalone for WSS installs, so it would be nice if they bundled it with the next equivalent of WSS. I have an unofficial confirm from an MS employee that features will be available in 2010 but no solid details so far.
  • Standardized UI across all Office products, browsers, mobile devices
  • Open API support
  • FAST Search for Server Enterprise owners
  • Upgrades to 2010 will rely heavily on the new upgrade scanning command in STSADM – available in SharePoint 2007 SP2
  • 2010 Q1 or Q2 projected release date

Hopes/Wants:

  • Native SQL tables for SharePoint lists – Ever since this interview with Bill Gates, I’ve hoped that this will actually come to fruition. But as with any Microsoft product, it […]
By |April 27th, 2009|Categories: Microsoft, Office, SharePoint|Tags: , , , |4 Comments

Sharepoint Update Log – Part 2

Part 1 Part 2

In Part 1 of this article I compared and contrasted the various methods that we could use for our Sharepoint update log application. I’ve chosen the custom aspx site/SQL table method as it is the most effective solution for what I currently need. I don’t intend to design a full-fledged application with reporting features, logins, AJAX menus(well.. maybe a little AJAX would be cool!), etc. I need a custom site that is independent of Sharepoint, so developers/admins can log their updates to the database. If Sharepoint breaks, then we should be able to access this data as it might help us determine the point of failure. Simple and effective.

My aspx site is uber-simple to the point to where you might question why I even spent time writing this article. Well, I’m glad you’re that concerned about my free time! I’m writing this, because I see a lot of IT shops without something like this. Keeping an update log for live servers should be a non-negotiable in your environment. I hope that this example will either offer you a solution that you can use immediately or provide you with a catalyst to design your own solution based on your needs. You don’t have to be a VB.NET guru to get this done. For this article, I’ll show you some screenshots, so you can laugh at see how simple this is.

sp_update_log1

  • As you can see I have a few drop down boxes and text boxes that match the table layout from the
By |December 18th, 2008|Categories: SharePoint|Tags: , , , , , |1 Comment

Sharepoint Update Log – Part 1

Part 1 Part 2

It’s not everyday that you find a company or IT department that keeps a structured and updated “update log” for their systems, let alone Sharepoint. Updating your software is as easy as clicking a few buttons and trusting that everything will work as advertised. And for the most part, application updates really do what they are supposed to without causing outages. With communities, blogs and wikis for just about every application in existence, developers find it much easier to distribute test builds to the masses and receive responses rather quickly. This translates to quicker bug fixes and an overall better experience for end-users. But this can also lead to an ultra-trusting mentality when it comes to updating your software with major upgrades and/or patches. It only takes one patch to create hours of work for you and your team to get the system back online when incompatibilities rear their ugly heads.

This three part article will aim to give you my thoughts for an effective update log for your Sharepoint servers.

NOTE: I’ve written this article with respect to Sharepoint specifically. It is part of a larger concept that could be incorporated into all LOB systems.

The first thing that we need to do is figure out where we should store our data. Depending on your needs and organizational size this may be a very simple setup, but it still helps to think it through first.

The table below summarizes a few pros and cons for 4 possible scenarios.

This is a pretty self-explanatory table, but I want to touch on one of these […]

By |August 21st, 2008|Categories: SharePoint|Tags: , , , , , |1 Comment